University of Rochester School of Nursing Remains Top 30 In NIH Funding

  By Ivy Burruto
  Monday, February 22, 2021 9:24 AM
  Rankings/Awards, Research

The University of Rochester School of Nursing remains in the top 30 in the annual rankings of research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The UR School of Nursing ranks 29th in research support from the NIH for the fiscal year 2020, the 12th time in the last 15 years the school has secured a spot in the top 30 of all nursing schools, according to data compiled by the Blue Ridge Institute of Medical Research.

The UR School of Nursing received over $2.5 million in research support for six grants in areas that cover cognitive aging, eating behaviors, HIV/AIDS research, and maternal and child health.

Titles of the NIH-funded grants include:

  • Targeting autonomic flexibility to enhance cognitive training outcomes in older adults with mild cognitive impairment
  • Validate a shared neural circuit underlying multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms
  • Longitudinal changes in weight and biology in the pregnancy-postpartum period and subsequent cardiometabolic risk
  • Multilevel determinants of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) utilization and health disparities among Black and Hispanic women
  • Delineation of the biopsychosocial risks of obesogenic eating behaviors

“Research has always been at the forefront of the UR School of Nursing’s mission. I’m proud of our faculty and staff who are committed to positioning our school at the cutting-edge of discovery,” said Dean Kathy Rideout, EdD, PPCNP-BC, FNAP.

 

 “I look forward to seeing what next year brings for the Harriet J. Kitzman Center for Research Support.”

The UR School of Nursing recently renamed its Center for Research Support in memory of longtime Senior Associate Dean of Research Harriet Kitzman, PhD, RN, FAAN.

The NIH is the largest public funding source for biomedical research in the world, investing more than $32 billion annually to enhance health, increase life spans, and reduce illness and disability.